Archive for the “Flatware” Category

The History of Hafnia By Yamazaki

The Distinguished History Of The Elegant Hafnia Flatware Line

Timeless Japanese design and Nordic practicality are a match made in heaven. Just take a look at the Scandinavian-influenced Hafnia flatware line by Yamazaki.

The brushed finish is simply gorgeous. Not only are the pieces unusually striking, but their weight and the curvature of their upturned handles make for the most comfortable silverware that we offer — and we offer more than 500 patterns.

As more and more manufacturers expand their brands to reach diverse markets, Yamazaki remains true to its roots. For 100 years, the fine stainless maker has stuck to its core competencies and catered to its loyal customers.

At Yamazaki, innovation thrives. Service is personalized. There are no compromises on quality. The Yamazaki collection reflects the passion of its leadership and is aptly named “The Art of Dining.”

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A Closer Look At Mepra Flatware

The Long, Colorful History of Mepra

The designers and craftsmen at Mepra go to impossible lengths to turn out deceptively simple-looking designs. Handling a piece of Mepra flatware is akin to admiring the work of a skilled, studied architect.

The brand name alludes to the company’s commitment to quality and tradition. Mepra is shorthand for Metallurgica Prandelli. Metallurgy is a branch of science and engineering concerned with the study of metallic elements. Prandelli is the family name, and that’s far more interesting to most people.

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The Last Of The American Flatware

Liberty Tabletop Profile

Made in America

Sherrill Manufacturing, known for Liberty Tabletop products, has an admirable and increasingly unique claim to fame: it is the only remaining flatware manufacturer in the U.S.

Even the quality stainless steel it uses is made right here in America. Sherrill tests for lead and other toxic trace elements. There are no shortcuts in the making of safe, durable products. Not only that, but high-grade stainless steel retains its appealing luster and resists staining for generations.

Sherrill Manufacturing has been at this for more than 100 years and is frequently lauded by the media. The New York Times, ABC, and NBC are just a few outlets that have featured the company. Since other American industries are disappearing in droves — according to The Times, there’s only one whistle maker, one barber pole manufacturer and a handful of sneaker factories left — Sherrill’s longevity is impressive.

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An Elegant Wedding Featuring Silver Superstore

Weddings with Silver Superstore

Whether you’re engaged to be married or you know someone who is, you’ve come to the right place. We offer a diverse collection of exquisite pieces to delight couples and their guests on that special day and for years to come. Keep reading to get ideas.

Cutting the Cake

Wedding cake evolved from the ancient Roman tradition of breaking bread over the bride’s head for good luck.

Wedding dresses are traditionally white because that’s the color Queen Victoria chose when she married Prince Albert in 1840. The queen also served an all-white cake. The ingredients in white icing were so rare and costly at the time that it came to be called royal icing. View Full Article…

A Closer Look At Fortessa

An In-Depth Look at Fortessa Flatware

If you’re looking for something especially classy, look no further than Fortessa flatware. You’ll find whimsical pieces, like fish forks, espresso spoons and even chopsticks, that competitors simply don’t offer. Another elegant touch is the punched Fortessa logo. Such luxury is more commonly found on high-end European flatware.

Many loyal customers had never heard of Fortessa, which is relatively new on the scene, until they inquired about the silverware in their favorite upscale restaurants.

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Beginners Guide To Seafood Cutlery

A Beginners Guide To Seafood Cutlery

Chowder Spoon by Yamazaki

Chowder Spoon

To the delight of rich folks all over England, separate courses became a way of dining and showing off in the 1850s. Twenty-four-piece place settings were not uncommon. Even guests who didn’t know any better found it hard to prop their elbows on the table.

Seafood utensils, some of the most misunderstood pieces of flatware, emerged during this time. Most are lovely and unusual, but a few are downright intimidating. Guests often wait nervously until a savvier dinner companion leads the way.

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